Supreme Court Denies to Hear Trek Leather Case

On May 26, 2015, the Supreme Court denied a petition to hear an appeal of Trek Leather, firmly establishing the lower court’s decision to hold corporate officers and employees of companies listed as the importer of record liable for customs violations.  The denial comes amidst a long list of other cases denied without explanation or comments.  The Supreme Court’s denial effectively lets stand the U.S. Court of Appeals decision finding that Harish Shadadpuri is personally liable for the corporation’s failure to declare assists on entry documentation. 

Although Shadadpuri was not listed as the importer of record, the U.S. Court of Appeals found him personally liable because he introduced goods into the United States by providing invoices that did not report assists provided to the manufacturer.  The court found that the transmission of the inaccurate invoices to the customs broker amounted to the “introduction” of the merchandise into United States commerce under 19 USC 1592.  Shadadpuri argued that he could not be held personally liable for a corporate importer of record unless he was found to have personally “aided and abetted” the violation, but, ultimately, the court sided with the government.

The decision has garnered significant criticism from importers and their representing bodies as the judgment is expected to dramatically expand the scope of liability for corporate executives, compliance officers, and other employees involved in daily import transactions or transmissions.  One such representing body, the American Association of Exporters and Importers (AAEI), filed a brief in support of Shadadpuri stating that the court’s decision has effectively lowered the government’s burden of proof for finding a natural person liable for customs violations by eliminating the requirement for the court to prove fraudulent intent. Further, AAEI feels that the term “introduce” has been wrongly reinterpreted to include “all activities to bring goods to the threshold of the process of entry,” so that, in effect, “every negligent entry by a corporate importer of record will always be accompanied by a negligent introduction.”  AAEI is concerned that this court decision will increase the trade industry’s risk and cost of doing business due to subjecting import compliance managers to massive penalties.  Some employees may not wish to work in jobs associated with higher personal risk of liability, or employees might seek additional compensation for their duties.  Further, AAEI suggested that some importers might choose to allow foreign suppliers to act as non-resident importers of record in order to have import transactions handled outside the reach of US jurisdiction.

Importers anxiously awaiting a Supreme Court hearing on Trek Leather are likely to be disappointed by the denial as the decision will have definite repercussions for the trade community.  Importers will surely continue to watch other cases to determine how far the court will take the Trek Leather case in applying it to other importers.   

Aaron Ambrite, Extern, Global Trade Expertise