Google Ordered to Turn Over Foreign Emails

Reuters reported that on February 3, 2017, Federal Magistrate Judge Thomas J. Rueter in Philadelphia handed down an opinion ordering Google to comply with a search warrant to provide emails stored outside the United States. Judge Rueter’s decision is at odds with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit’s Microsoft Ireland Warrant case which was recently turned down for a rehearing.

According to Judge Rueter’s decision, electronically transferring data from a server in a foreign country to Google’s data center in California did not constitute a “seizure” because there was no meaningful interference with the account holder’s possessory interest in the user data.

The case pertains to two Stored Communication Act (SCA) warrants served on Google regarding the contents of emails. Google did submit emails that it knows were stored in the United States, but refused to provide emails that could be stored outside the country. Apparently, Google routinely breaks up emails and stores them within a network of servers outside the U.S. The company maintains it does not always know where certain emails might be located, and so declined to provide them under the Second Circuit’s Microsoft case.

Back in July of 2016, advocates such as the ACLU and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce had been pleased with the ruling in the Microsoft case (which said the company could not be forced to turn over documents stored on a server in Dublin, Ireland.) Now, eight months later, Rueter’s ruling orders Google to comply with the search warrant it received.

Many technology companies now consider the Stored Communication Act (SCA), a federal law dating to 1986, to be outdated.